JOD – Jordanian Dinar

Monetary System

1 Jordanian dinar (JOD) = 10 dirham = 100 piastres = 1,000 fils

2002 – 2020 Fourth Series Issues

Description: 1.00 JOD – Jordanian Dinar Size: 133 x 74 mm

Green and blue. Front: Arabic text; Hashemite silver coins struck in The Kingdom of Hijaz in 1916; Sharif Hussein Bin Ali. Back: English text; three men riding camels with flag of the Great Arab Revolt; Renaissance medal; antique compass from the Levant. Solid security thread and windowed security thread with demetalized CBJ 1. Watermark: Varieties. Printer: (De La Rue). 133 x 74 mm. Paper.

Description: 5.00 JOD – Jordanian Dinar Size: 137 x 74 mm

Orange, red, and brown. Front: Arabic text; King Abdullah on horseback inspecting army troops and calvary; King Abdullah Bin Al-Hussein and his seal; gold coin struck in 1916 – Proclamation of the Great Arab Revolt. Back: Ummayad coin struck at a mint in Jordan; King Abdullah Bin Al-Hussein headquarters – Ma’an Palace; trees. Solid security thread and windowed security thread with demetalized CBJ 5. Watermark: King Abdullah Bin Al-Hussein and electrotype Arabic text. Printer: (De La Rue). 137 x 74 mm. Paper.

Description: 10.00 JOD – Jordanian Dinar Size: 141 x 74 mm

Blue and violet. Front: Arabic text; Um Qais Museum building; King Talal; stamp commemorating the establishment of the Parliament: foil seal obscures vertical s/n. Back: English text;decorative pattern from Al Qastal; men with flags entering first Parliament building; Bedouins on camels in Wadi Rum valley. Solid security thread and windowed security thread with demetalized CBJ 10. Watermark: King Talal and electrotype Arabic text. Printer: (De La Rue). 141 x 74 mm. Paper.

Description: 10.00 JOD – Jordanian Dinar Size: 141 x 74 mm

Blue and violet. Front: Arabic text; Um Qais Museum building; King Talal; stamp commemorating the establishment of the Parliament; foil seal does not obscure vertical s/n. Back: English text;decorative pattern from Al Qastal; men with flags entering first Parliament building; Bedouins on camels in Wadi Rum valley. Solid security thread and windowed security thread with demetalized CBJ 10. Watermark: King Talal and electrotype Arabic text. Printer: (De La Rue). 141 x 74 mm. Paper.
Like previous issue , but portrait and design elements shifted to avoid overprinting foil seal with vertical s/n.

Description: 20.00 JOD – Jordanian Dinar Size: 145 x 74 mm

Green and blue. Front: Arabic text; King Abdullah Mosque with minarets; King Hussein Bin Talal; holographic patch. Back: English text; Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem. Solid security thread and windowed security thread with demetalized CBJ 20. Watermark: King Hussein Bin Talal and electrotype Arabic text. Printer: (De La Rue). 145 x 74 mm. Paper.

Description: 50.00 JOD – Jordanian Dinar Size: 149 x 74 mm

Brown, purple, and orange. Front: Arabic text; King Abdullah II; coat of arms holographic patch. Back: English text; carved marble from Al Aqsa mosque; Raghadan palace building; black iris flower. Solid security thread and windowed security thread with demetalized CBJ 50. Watermark: King Abdullah II and electrotype Arabic text. Printer: (De La Rue). 149 x 74 mm. Paper.

Hashemite Kingdom of the Jordan

From 1927 to 1950, the Palestine Currency Board issued Palestinian pounds as the official currency in both Palestine and the Trans-Jordan Emirate. After Jordan became an independent kingdom on 25 May 1946, the idea of issuing a national currency arose and led to the passing of the Provisional Act No. 35 of 1949. Under this Act, the Jordan Currency Board was formed, which became the sole authority entitled to issue Jordanian currency in the kingdom. The London-based entity consisted of a president and four members. As of 1 July 1950, the Jordanian dinar became the kingdom’s official currency, and use of the Palestinian pound ceased in the kingdom on 30 September 1950. Although issued by the Jordan Currency Board, the notes bear the name of The Hashemite Kingdom of the Jordan.

Buying Banknotes

The Central Bank of Jordan sells sets of banknotes directly to the public.

Currency Museum

In the early 1980s, the Central Bank of Jordan opened a Currency Museum at its headquarters on King Hussein Street in Amman.